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I was recruited to produce an adventure for my local library’s teenage D&D event that will be running tomorrow, and while it’s taken more time than I thought, I’ve had the opportunity to learn to use a half dozen new pieces of software and brush up a bit on my writing, editing, sketching, painting and cartography.  Some of the need to learn new tricks is due to the midstream switch to using the Roll20 website for remote play instead of just meeting at the library in person.  I like learning new things and finding ways to make old tools do new things, so this has been a good experience.  It does wind up taking longer than just using old, mastered tools, but I like to think that the ability to learn new things is a healthy one, even if it hasn’t led to more employment opportunities.

This “module” of sorts is offered as a free download.  It was done for the Orem Public Library, using some of my own art, a bit from my daughter, and free assets from other sites, noted in the text.  It’s designed as a toolkit; a setting, maps, an adventure, a handful of monsters and some NPC “seeds” to spur adventures.  You can play through the adventure or just noodle around in some of the maps, fighting monsters.  It’s an introductory sort of thing, meant to engage teens who may never have played an RPG before.  I haven’t yet produced the “printer friendly” version of the file, since making the Roll20-ready assets was the priority, but I’ll see about getting those optimized monochrome assets done in the next week or so, time allowing.

If you do poke around in these files, I’d welcome feedback of any sort.  I believe it will serve its stated purpose, even as I admit that I’m new to the 5th Edition of D&D, as well as the production software, so this isn’t going to be as polished as some of those glossy minibooks that the Pathfinder or D&D people produce.  I may also note that I’m not attached to any particular RPG, and this production was meant to be flexible; it could be tweaked fairly easily for use in other systems.

Please feel free to download these files and reproduce them for personal or nonprofit use.  Tangentially, I also modeled a sculpture of the “Gyro Golem” for use on the library’s 3D printers, but that sort of fell by the wayside.  It’s also available as a free download on Thingiverse or Pinshape.

GyroGolemRenderCropped

Thank you, and hopefully these are of some use to you!

LibraryOfTheLost2020

(Link above is to the master PDF, the following are supplemental images for Roll20 usage)

 

Roll20Prep

 

I’ve been meaning to recycle this article for a while, and I had a few minutes to work on it lately.  It’s more or less a copy/paste of an art tutorial I wrote up for the player forums for YoHoHo Puzzle Pirates!, a game that I still think well of, even if it’s in its sunset years.

I tend to sketch with ballpoint pens, and paint in Photoshop.  This tutorial covers taking what I think of as a rough sketch, and turning it into a 150×150 pixel “avatar”, but some of the techniques work elsewhere.  I do seem to be missing some of the original art, sadly, but the original article is still up on the YPP! forums over here:

Silveransom’s Avatar Tech

For a “Reader’s Digest Condensed Version”, please continue, and as always, I’m happy to answer questions.  I’ve added a few asides here and there, always in italics.

=====================================================

It’s come up a few times, and I’ve wanted to do a Photoshop tutorial since before my YPP days, so here’s a whirlwind tour of my methodology of avatar art. It’s actually a bit generalized, but this is how I wind up doing most of my avatar art.

1. Draw something cool in my sketchbook. I do this with a ballpoint pen, most of the time. It’s personal preference… as is the definition of “cool”. This particular monkey is actually a component of an avatar I did for Phillite. He works as a standalone critter, though, so I’m reusing him for this project. (Which also means that, as might be expected, I ask that the art in this thread not be used elsewhere.)

2. Scan it in to Photoshop, usually at 600 dpi. This gives me room to play with effects. I usually shrink it down once it’s all painted the way I like it, but I like working big. It gives me more freedom to try big, sweeping brushstrokes, and more precision in tweaking. I bought a cheap Memorex scanner on sale for $40 years ago, and it’s been fantastic.
By the way, if you’re serious about computer art, do yourself a favor and get a tablet. Wacom Bamboo tablets are a great entry level product. The software doesn’t matter all that much, since paint.net, GIMP and ArtRage are free and will suffice (Clip Studio Paint and Affinity work as fairly low cost powerful single-purchase alternatives as well), and some tablets come with software. I use Photoshop Elements 2 because it’s what I have handy. I also use Painter on occasion, but that’s an indulgence. The tablet, though… that’s almost essential.

MonkeyTutorial01

3. Use Photoshop’s Levels modifier to clean up the sketch. I make a duplicate of the scanned layer, just in case I need the original for some reason, and apply Levels (Ctrl-L) to the duplicate. Pulling in both end knots a wee bit cleans up most of the static that came from the scan.

MonkeyTutorial02

4. Since my sketches tend to be a little rough, I need to do some Rubber Stamp surgery to clean up a bit. The Rubber Stamp tool takes data from a source part of the image, and replicates it elsewhere. You Alt-click to define the source, and then “paint” the duplicate, winding up with this sort of effect, here duplicating the alternate arm’s thumb:

MonkeyTutorial03

5. Rubber Stamp to clean the drawing, like this, cloning in the blank paper/background into the areas that should be clean on the drawing… it may take a bit of work and several clone source points, chosen each time with the Alt-Click:

MonkeyTutorial04

6. I then make a new level (on which I’ll be painting), and move the clean sketch to the top of the stack, and set the level blending type to Multiply. This lets me treat it as an outline, and paint the color in underneath.

MonkeyTutorial05

7. Start painting on a layer underneath the drawing. I don’t paint on the drawing layer. All coloring takes place on layers between the drawing and the white background layer I’ve set up. This gives me the ability to tweak the painting independent of the background and the sketch. This use of layers is one of the huge strengths of Photoshop (or any program that uses layers), and why working digitally can be a very different animal from traditional art.

MonkeyTutorial06

8. The base color for the monkey is in, carefully covering his space. Now, it’s time for another layer for the shadowing.

MonkeyTutorial07

9. The shadow layer is just a bit of paint that’s darker than the base color. It’s painted in a bit roughly at first…

MonkeyTutorial08

10. Then the Gaussian Blur filter gets applied, to soften it up (I usually do this, as illustrated, on a copy of the shadow painting layer, just in case I need to go back a step and tweak it):

MonkeyTutorial09

11. This makes for a nice rounding effect, and even gives a nice “reflected lighting” subtlety to the larger areas, like the monkey’s torso. (The dark side of most objects in real space is tempered a bit by reflected light, which this neatly simulates.)

MonkeyTutorial11

 

12. The Gaussian Blur pretty much obliterates the subtle shadows in the hair, so I make a new layer, and start painting in new, detailed shadows. These are brushstrokes, like the main shadow layer, but I don’t use the Gaussian Blur on these. I just use the Smudge tool to push things around the way I like them. Here’s a close shot on the hair in progress:

MonkeyTutorial10

and the tail:

MonkeyTutorial12

and I sharpen up the cast shadow under the chin with a few additive strokes:

MonkeyTutorial13

13. Erase around the edges of both shadow layers. It’s a subtle thing, but this shows how the Gaussian Blur pushed the color out of the outlines. I prefer to keep things clean, so I erase the blurred bit.  Of further note, looking at this from 2019, this edge cleanup can also be accomplished by putting all of the color layers into a layer group, and adding a layer mask to that group that simply masks off anything not inside of where you want colors.  This lets you create the edge cleanup for all of the color layers with a single operation, which is a great update to the workflow.  Photoshop Elements 2 had neither layer masks nor layer groups, so this is a bare-bones tutorial.  The fuller releases of Photoshop give more tools to work with, including “Smart Objects”, which I’ll revisit in a different tutorial.

MonkeyTutorial14

14. Now for a highlight layer. I do this the same way I did the shadow layer, just with a different color, and from a different direction. In other words, paint,

MonkeyTutorial15

blur,

MonkeyTutorial16

and make a secondary highlight layer for detail work, then erase around the edges to be clean:

MonkeyTutorial17

15. Since monkeys in YPP have a two tone look to them, with the belly, feet, hands and face a different color, I make a new layer to try to get this effect.

MonkeyTutorial18

16. Paint the relevant parts in a lighter color, then change the layer Blending options to get the desired effect. I settled on Soft Light. This allows me to paint in a second color tone, without losing the shading and hair effects I’ve made so far.  I’m using a subtle secondary tone here, and you can do more with color shifting by using a different paint color and layer compositing effects like Hue (instead of Soft Light) that shifts the color underneath while maintaining the shading:

MonkeyTutorial19

MonkeyTutorial20

17. Close to being done, it’s time for little tuning. I decided that the monkey’s belly needed a bit more dimension, so I added a bit to the shadows:

MonkeyTutorial21

18. Finish by painting the sword on a few new layers, using similar effects for shading:

MonkeyTutorial22

Add a layer for his eyes and nose…
aaand he’s done!

MonkeyTutorial23

Since this was done at 600 dpi, it’s not really ready for an avatar. It comes out to be this big, useful for seeing detail:

Monkey2Huge

 

After rescaling the resolution, a middle sized version looks like this:

Monkey2Med

And the avatar might look like this:

Monkey2Avvie

It loses a lot of detail at that scale, so this methodology isn’t always appropriate. It’s how I work because I like to have my art around at high resolution if I need it for my portfolio, especially if I need to print it out. Working high and reducing as necessary winds up looking a lot better than working small and magnifying it if necessary.

I would also usually go back and flatten some layers, erase the edges, throw in a background and/or a border… but that’s about it.

Thanks for stopping by! I’m happy to answer any questions.

-Silver

Hello everyone!

TinkerTrainBitsSplashBlueTrouble

Yes, it’s been far too long since I’ve posted here, but that’s just how life goes sometimes.  This time, as last time, it’s to announce a new Kickstarter campaign we’re running, this time for some steampunk train-themed tabletop game bits.

Trouble on the Tracks: Tinker Bits IV

There are a bunch of photos of the prototypes over here, too:

Project Khopesh on Pinterest, Tinker Train Bits

Please spread the word!  Promotional algorithms on social media sites aren’t kind to self-promotion, and many forums outright forbid it.  It’s hobbling crowdfunding a bit, and we greatly appreciate any boosted signal that you can offer, even if you don’t want to jump into the project yourself.

Thank you all!

Tesh

…and yes, there are still some “Steam backlog” mini reviews in the pipeline, I just need to make time to polish things up a bit.

OK, we’re live!  Thank you all for stopping by and checking out the preview last time, and please spread the word on this project!  We’re looking forward to getting the dragons made, especially, but all 4 designs are fun additions to the Tinker line of goodies.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tishtoshtesh/tinker-bits-iii-scourge-of-the-skies-metal-meeples/description

ScourgeOfTheSkiesSplashB

ScourgeOfTheSkiesSplashB

Meeples, Mayhem and Mangling

It’s time to follow up on the Meeple Mayhem post.  Past time, actually, but life is busy.

I promised to do some damage to some meeples last time.  I didn’t get to do quite what I had planned, but I did get to send them through a cycle and a half in the clothes dryer.  I figured that the warmth, slightly elevated humidity and constant agitation could simulate wear and tear of backpacks and pockets well enough to get some bead on what might happen over time with them.

For the most part, it looks like the bag that they were in doesn’t make much difference.  They all wound up dinged a bit, and there are the occasional bits of plating that come off, most notable on the antiqued copper.  This isn’t a surprise, but it’s nice to have some photos to show what happened.

I did run into a weird event where it looks like the Top Hat male first generation Tinker meeple, finished in “Misty Gold”, wound up mostly stripped of gold.  None of the other designs had this happen for their Misty Gold, though, and looking back at the “before” photo, I can’t be sure that I actually had a Misty Gold Top Hat meeple in the batch in the first place.  I grabbed one from each of my bins, but maybe the one that I thought was Misty Gold was actually another Antiqued Silver.

1280_MeepleBagTestTopHats

So, I did another experiment with just 4 Top Hat meeples, making sure that there was a Misty Gold in the mix.  This one didn’t have a big problem, though it did show a bit more wear than the other colors (mostly some thinning in the face area, no big chips or scrapes).

As such, I think that for the most part, I’m happy with how these worked out.  The Misty Gold Top Hat does disappoint me a bit, but gold is soft, so this isn’t shocking, sadly.  I wish I could say with impunity that these little folk were incredibly durable, but it’s just a reality that any plated metal will have this sort of issue.  We can’t really make solid copper or solid gold meeples… though that would certainly be a blast if we could say we did and they sold enough to make it worthwhile.

At any rate, overall I’m sufficiently pleased with the overall durability, since the zinc alloy core is plenty tough.  The dings and scrapes that come with life as a metal are just part of the bargain in my book, but it’s nice to finally have some photos to show off.

It might also be worth noting that this just simulates mechanical wear and tear.  I haven’t found a great way to simulate months and/or years of handling with the natural oils on human skin.  I suspect that such would be a surface issue, though, so you’re likely to see the same sort of effects that you might have with other metallic items, like truly silver silverware or copper coins.

Thank you!

This is something that I should have done before now, but it’s time to do some transportation experiments with our metal meeples.  Specifically, I’m going to put five groups of meeples into five different bags, carry them around and beat them up a bit, and see just how well they handle the experience.

1280_MeepleBagTestSplash

First, the “Top Hat” meeples, in a not-quite-silk bag.  It’s the smoothest, softest bag I have on hand.

1280_MeepleBagTestTopHats

Second, the “Dame” meeples in a flashy pink leather bag.  It’s soft, slightly fuzzy leather, just… pink.

1280_MeepleBagTestDames

Third, the “Mad Scientist” meeples in a rubber and metal chain mail bag.  We picked this one up on Kickstarter here, and while it’s a fantastic bag, I’m curious to see how the metals cooperate, or fail to.

1280_MeepleBagTestMadScientists

Fourth, the “Tinkerer” meeples, in a rough burlap sack.  The life of a Tinkerer can be rough, scraping by with odds and ends.

1280_MeepleBagTestTinkerers

Fifth, the “Fairy” meeples will be in a small soft cloth bag, sort of a velour material.  It’s a bit more textured and solid than the silk-like bag.

1280_MeepleBagTestFairies

I’ll hang these on our stationary bicycle and let them bump around a bit, then pack them in a backpack for a while, letting them mosh about in the bottom.  We’ll see how things turn out, and I’ll take some “after” photos after a week of the beatings.

See you on the other side!

Just a quick observation this time:  The Mad Science Metal Meeples are out the door later today, so that’s another Kickstarter project wrapped and polished off.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tishtoshtesh/tinker-bits-ii-mad-science-metal-meeples/posts/1952937

I’ve no idea what happens next.  I have 3 projects I’d like to do… tomorrow, but this pesky thing called “real life” has me scrambling to see about getting a second college degree in a maybe-futile effort at a new career.  This is also why I haven’t written here much in the past few years; the simple problem with finding ways to pay the bills means I don’t have the luxury of blathering as much as I’d like.  There’s no lack of ideas, just a lack of time.

Mad Science Metal Meeples!

We launched a new Kickstarter campaign, this time for some more metal meeples.  We’re making the Mad Scientists and Tinkerer designs.  Please spread the word!

They are funded, so they will get made, it’s just a question now of how many and where we’re sending them.

Tinker Mad Science Meeples

600_MadScienceSplash

Thank you!

Dragon Aged

Yes, it’s been a while.  Yes, I have a lot of things I could and would like to write about.

For now, though, I’m short on time.  I wanted to show this design, though, for the Dragon Tinker Metal Meeple that I’d like to get made in a Kickstarter project later this year.  The “Dame”, “Fairy” and Top Hat” designs included for scale (the Top Hat gentleman is pretty standard meeple size, at 20mm tall or so, meaning this Dragon would be about 30mm tall, or 1 and 1/6″).  The Dragon has a normal mechanized Dragon side, and an “aged” side, to give it a bit of gravitas.  This also allows me to hint that it would be made of different metals, given that some parts don’t show the aging.

dragondesigns

This is the last design I’ve had in mind for now, though I certainly can come up with others, and there are some Carcassonne expansion meeples that I haven’t had time to work with yet.  They are less popular, though, and possibly less usable out of that game, so we’re sticking with more universal designs for the moment.  Like the Mad Scientist…

madscientistproto02frontback

The Tinkerer…

meepletinkererfproto01

and the Sky Pirate and Rocketeer…

skypiraterocketeer_600

Now, I really would like to get the Tinker Steampunk-flavored Carcassonne tile variant designs done.  They will take a bit more time, of course, and since I can’t really sell them, they will be a back burner “labor of love” sort of thing.

Then there’s the Pantheon Wars game, the Fudging Fates dice and this other game I’m designing, tentatively calling it Shattervale… there’s a lot to do.